IVC Carriage (formerly known as Iowa Valley Carriage) - Equestrian Driving Equipment

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Our Favorite Things - 2020 version

Our Favorite Things - 2020 version 0

Last year, I wrote a post regarding my favorite carriage driving items. This year we have some new items that I would have a hard time living without.
“Level” Shafts?

“Level” Shafts? 4

You may have heard that the shafts on your two-wheeled cart should be level with the ground. The correct answer to that perception is “maybe”. It really depends on a number of factors with the cart.  Shafts parallel to the ground is a bit of a misnomer by beginning drivers.
Long Lining or Ground Driving?

Long Lining or Ground Driving? 0

A lot of new drivers are under the impression that a major step in training the driving horse is ground driving, walking behind the horse like you were in a vehicle, but without the vehicle attached. We do more what I refer to as “long lining” which is basically staying in the center of the arena while the horse goes around.
The Helmet Fascinator

The Helmet Fascinator 2

Youth have to wear an approved helmet at all times when on the show grounds. When we had a cute teenage girl showing with our phaeton cart, her helmet needed something that made it look a little more feminine and elegant besides just the helmet cover.
Gullet Clearance… What is it and Why is it Important?

Gullet Clearance… What is it and Why is it Important? 1

You might hear an experienced carriage driver talk about gullet clearance on a driving saddle. This is because there are a lot of inexpensive harnesses on the market that don’t provide any spine relief in any capacity. A good driving saddle provides gullet clearance for any shape horse.
Communication Mistakes We’ve Made

Communication Mistakes We’ve Made 0

I recently had a request from one of our customers to write about how to avoid a “rolling domestic” while on the carriage with your spouse or significant other. If both of you are involved in carriage driving like our family, you are bound to have a few disagreements over the years.